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Course Descriptions - 2011

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Winter 2011


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
SMI 305 - SLN: 11446
Instructor: Ileana Marin
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 10:30am - 11:20am
MLR 302A - SLN: 11447
Instructor: Lin Chen
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 11:30am - 12:20pm
MLR 302A - SLN: 11452
Instructor: Russell Black
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
MGH 295 - SLN: 11453
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
LOW 217 - SLN: 11454
Instructor: Artur Rosman
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 4:30pm - 5:20pm
MGH 295 - SLN: 11455
Instructor: Nobuko Yamasaki
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
KNE 220 - SLN: 11457
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Surrealism, which emerged in Paris in the early 1920s from the social upheaval of post-WWI Europe and more especially from Dadaism, is arguably the most influential avant-garde movement of the 20th century. It rejected social, moral and logical conventions and sought to revolutionize art, literature, politics and life in the name of freedom, desire and the unconscious. Surrealist art, which was viewed by the surrealists as a means of liberation beyond purely aesthetic considerations, is characterized by a diversity of forms of expression: writing, painting, drawing, photography, film, collage, found objects, sculpture, theater; and of practices: automatic writing, hypnosis, and somnambulic strolling in the streets of Paris. We will study all these forms of expression and examine the challenges surrealism poses to traditional notions of art, literature and politics.

Readings: André Breton, Manifestoes of Surrealism; Communicating Vessels; Nadja; Louis Aragon, Paris Peasant.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
KNE 110 - SLN: 11462
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The mastermind behind the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony, Zhang Yimou, gained world fame for his martial arts movies, Hero and House of Flying Daggers. Twenty years earlier, Zhang was among the pioneers of the new Chinese cinema, with great works such as Raise the Red Lantern. The course follows the trajectory of one of the world's most fascinating filmmakers and asks, What makes a great director?


MTTh 5:30pm - 7:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11473
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

This quarter we are going to consider the impact of Third Cinema on more contemporary work around the world. Fundamentally, third cinema is that of anti-colonial resistance emerging out of Latin America and Africa in the 1960s. It has had such enormous impact that each time film theorists declare its demise, new questions (which may actually be old questions) arise. We may or may not determine the declared death of Third Cinema premature. As such, ―Third Cinema: a Call to Action‖ begins by contextualizing the works of such anti-colonial filmmakers as Pontecorvo, Solonas, Rouch, Cisse and Sembene to revisit the significance of a Third lens.

We trouble the language and politics of Diaspora, imperfect, hybrid, creolized, transnational cinemas over time and space as these are taken up within the contexts of more contemporary queer, feminist, anti-racist and post-colonial cultural production. We ask what it means to claim inheritance of third cinema practice in contemporary First Nations film as well as that of Latino, African and Asian Diaspora within North America, and the U.K.


MW
JHN - SLN: 11474
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Film history from its beginnings in the 1890s through the golden era of silent film in the 1920s. Topics include the invention of major film techniques, the creation of Hollywood and the studios, and movements such as expressionism, constructivism, and surrealism.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11475
Instructor: James Tweedie
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Covers the vast changes in filmmaking since 1960. Topics include the continuing influence of the French New Wave, the New German Cinema of the 70s and the "New Hollywood" of the 70s, American independent film of the 80s, and the resurgence of Chinese filmmaking since 1980.


MW
MGH - SLN: 11476
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Is Bollywood all there is to Indian cinema? This course is an introduction to Indian cinema, or more appropriately, the many cinemas of India. Spend 10 weeks watching great Indian movie classics and new surprises - violent urban gangster films, morbidly humorous films about youth cyber culture, unlikely Shakespeare adaptations, Paris as an exotic and distant city, inventive new sports comedies, to name just a few themes.

Our introduction will be structured thematically around broad ideas - nationalism and Indian cinema; film and mass media; film and the urban experience; cinema and globalization; cinema as experimental and avant-garde art practice. Where possible, we will also explore the relation between film and other practices of image production - popular film posters, lithographed religious calendar images, photography, traveling slide show exhibitors.

Movies will be in Indian languages and subtitled in English. Titles include: LSD: Love Sex aur Dhoka (Love, Sex and Betrayal, 2010, English/Hindi); Satya (Truth, 1998, Hindi), Pyaasa (Thirst, 1957, Hindi/Urdu), Chennai 600028 (2008, Tamil), An Evening in Paris (1967, Hindi), Pather Panchali (Song of the Little Road, 1957, Bengali), Harishchandrachi Factory (Harishchandra's Factory, 2009, Marathi).

Course work includes two screenings and two lecture sessions a week. Readings will be drawn mainly from film studies but will include scholarship from other disciplines such as art history, anthropology, urban theory and sociology.

Grading will draw on short response papers, a longer term-end essay and participation.


MW 9:30am - 11:20am
SAV 131 - SLN: 11478
Instructor: Henry J. Staten
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examination of the development of European literature in a variety of genres and periods. Possible areas of study include literature from romantic fiction of early nineteenth century through great realist classics of second half of the century or from symbolism to expressionism and existentialism.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 132 - SLN: 11479
Instructor: Laura Eshleman
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Both travel and writing are journeys to where one isn‘t. Alternately said, literature and travel are means through which one comes to know oneself and the world. Traveling has always been closely tied to the act of writing, of narrating physical and mental displacements, crossings and arrivals. This course will examine the poetics and politics of narrated accounts of journeys to places, real or imaginary. The diversity of travel literature is immense, including examples of diaries and journals, poetry, novels, guide books, journalism, essays, official reports, autobiography, and even science fiction. The course will attempt to offer students an introduction to travel literature by examining an international selection of texts, ancient to recent, that highlight a constellation of issues associated with travel literature. Some course themes: truth, authorship, imperialism and decolonization, anxiety about borders, experience and memory, time, sex and gender, exploration and encounter, Self and Other, mobility, immigration, rhetoric and aesthetics, geography and space, the bildungsroman, symbol and allegory, language, historiography, fantasy, and the dissemination of knowledge. The course will probe the boundary between the discourse of travel and other kinds of writing, and examine the intimate relationships between travel, writing, imagination, and desire. In addition to generating critical writing on the subject of travel literature, students will also complete a practica in which they produce a piece of travel writing that responds to course themes. All texts in English or English translation.


MTWTh 11:30am - 12:20pm
DEN 313 - SLN: 11480
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Survey of various genres of folk narratives studied in performance contexts to reveal their socio-cultural functions in a variety of milieux. Theory and history of folk narrative study, taxonomy, genre classification, and interpretative approaches. Recommended: SCAND 230 or C LIT 230.

Folk narratives (folktales, legends and jokes) are a window into a group's worldview. This course will survey the theory and history of folk narrative study, methods of classification, and interpretative approaches. (No required prerequisites for this course)


MW 9:30am - 11:20am
DEN 211 - SLN: 11481
Instructor: Míċeál Vaughan
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Medieval Legends of Good Women: At the end of the fourteenth century, the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer produced, among his last works, a collection of narratives he called "Seintes Legende of Cupide." Alternatively titled The Legend of Good Women, the collection contains stories about a dozen ancient women (and their men), e.g., Cleopatra, Dido, Thisbe, Medea, to mention a few. A close reading of the Legend reveals how Chaucer‘s late-medieval narratives about these classical heroines have been influenced by genres like the Christian saint‘s life and the traditions of so-called "courtly love." The tensions between the ideals of Christian hagiography and courtly romance lend a lively complexity to his stories, and to their interpretation.

This course will attempt to define these competing ideals by discussing literary examples from ancient times – in the Old Testament (e.g., the books of Ruth, Judith, and Esther) and Ovid‘s Heroides -- through the Middle ages, with its rich range of saints lives, retellings of Ovid, and classic works like the Romance of the Rose, Dante‘s Vita Nuova, and Boccaccio's Famous Women. After looking at Juan Ruiz's Book of Good Love, we‘ll turn to Chaucer's Legend (and perhaps some of his other works), and conclude with his near-contemporary, Christine de Pizan, esp. her Book of the City of Ladies.


MWF 1:30pm - 2:50pm
MEB 248 - SLN: 11482
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

This course will introduce the modern literature of South Asia (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) from the fifteenth century to the present. Focus will be on novels, short stories and poetry from various South Asian languages (read in translation). The first half of the course covers two novels by women authors, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri and The Crooked Line by Ismat Chughtai. Both detail the coming-of-age of a young protagonist: a second-generation Bengali American coming to terms with his identity in 1980s America (The Namesake); and a young Muslim girl moving from village to city in pre-Independence north India (The Crooked Line). In the second half of the course, we turn to shorter and more complex literary forms: a selection of short stories on the 1947 Independence/Partition of India and Pakistan, followed by Moth Smoke, a recent allegorical novel on present-day Pakistan by Mohsin Hamid. After a brief unit on stories of morality and deception from R.K. Narayan‘s Malgudi Days, we conclude with examples of poetry from the Hindu devotional (bhakti) and Urdu classical lyric (ghazal) traditions. No background in South Asian literature or languages is presupposed. Class sessions will focus on discussion and analysis. Assignments will include close reading and short essay assignments; a group presentation; participation in class discussion; and a final paper.


MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
SMI 205 - SLN: 11483
Instructor: Richard Block
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

What does it mean to seek equal status as a citizen when the primary marker of one‘s identity, that of being Jewish, is indicative of a dream to return to Zion? How does one demand of the other, the Jew, that (s)he become German when the very notion of ―Germanness‖ is vague, uncertain, and forever changing? These are the primary questions that will structure our discussions during the term. We will also be interested in the tragic trajectory that proposed solutions to these problems assumed. In other words, we will seek to understand why for Jews the eventual solution to their predicament in Germany was to abandon dreams of assimilation and argue for the birth of a Jewish state. Conversely, we will examine how religious anti-Semitism led to racial anti-Semitism and finally to genocidal anti-Semitism. That is, how for Germans the solution to the ―Jewish problem‖ became a final one: the extermination of all Jews from the globe.

The course will also pursue a second trajectory, namely, the messianic in Jewish thought. How does the coming of the messiah or the fact that he has not yet arrived affect the disposition Jews assume toward their own lives? How do they read history? How do they conceive of truth when truth is not yet revealed save through ritual law? And finally, what does revolution have to do with the Jewish notion of messianism?


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 168 - SLN: 19819
Instructor: José Alaniz
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course surveys graphic novels, newspaper strips, alternative publications, comic books and other media from the 19th century to 1960, the period when comic art entered its modern incarnation or "Golden Age." Among other topics, we will discuss the origins, aesthetics and definitional debates of the comics medium; comics‘ impact on American and world popular culture; the politics of categorizing art into "ages"; and attempts at comics censorship culminating in the 1954 US congressional subcommittee hearings on juvenile delinquency. Authors covered include George Herriman, Milton Caniff, Hergé, Yoshihiro Tatsumi, Bernard Krigstein, Winsor McCay, Richard F. Outcault, Charles Schultz, Jack Kirby, Will Eisner, Fletcher Hanks and Rodolphe Töpffer.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
WFS 201 - SLN: 11484
Instructor: Tom Colonnese
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. Examines the foundations of American Indian stereotypes and how Hollywood helped create and perpetuate those stereotypes. Activities include reading critical materials, and viewing, discussing, and writing critically about films by non-native directors.


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 11485
Instructor: Albert Sbragia
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

The effort in France in the 1950s to define the cinematic director as the auteur or author of his/her films is the starting point for this course which seeks to introduce undergraduate students to post-war and contemporary European cinema through the films of the continent‘s most creative cineastes. The course will follow a loosely chronological trajectory and will examine the European directors preferred by the Cahiers critics, the French New Wave cinema, the questioning of auteurist cinema by directors in the early sixties, the Czech New Wave and New German Cinema of the sixties and seventies, the Dogme 95 cineastes, Almodovar and New Spanish Cinema, as well as more recent trends in European cinema. Course work includes weekly screenings, lectures and readings as well as a paper and examinations.


TT
LOW - SLN: 11486
Instructor: Eric Ames
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

This course explores the terrain of documentary cinema through the films of Werner Herzog from 1970 to the present. What defines documentary as both distinct from and related to fiction? How do Herzog and his films relate, historically, to the idea and the practice of documentary filmmaking? Each week we will view and discuss one of Herzog's films (including Fata Morgana, Land of Silence and Darkness, The Great Ecstasy of Woodcarver Steiner, Lessons of Darkness, Bells from the Deep, Little Dieter Needs to Fly, My Best Fiend, and Grizzly Man) along with one documentary made by another filmmaker (such as Jonathan Caouette, Robert Flaherty, Robert Gardner, Kazuo Hara, Errol Morris, Ulrich Seidl), asking what the various combinations tell us both about Herzog and about documentary cinema more generally. In English.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 167 - SLN: 11494
Instructor: Laura Chrisman

PH.D. PROGRAM IN THEORY AND CRITICISM: POSTCOLONIAL LITERARY STUDIES

This class offers an introduction to the field of postcolonial literary studies: its development, aesthetic articulations, theoretical frameworks, major debates, and new directions. Rather than take 'post-colonial' as an unproblematic term, the course addresses the intellectual, aesthetic and material stakes involved in its deployment. We will investigate issues of colonial and imperial domination, decolonization movements, nationalism, neocolonialism, and globalization. We will explore early/mid 20th century theories of anti-colonial resistance, as well as theories associated with the institutional emergence of the field in the 1980s and also consider more recent developments and contestations of the field. Throughout the course the theoretical readings will be accompanied by creative literary readings; students are expected to develop the tools for placing literary and theoretical materials in productive conversation through careful close reading of both.


Spring 2011


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
SMI 405 - SLN: 11515
Instructor: Russell Black
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF
DEN - SLN: 11516
Instructor: Amal Eqeiq
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 11:30am - 12:20pm
LOW 217 - SLN: 11517
Instructor: Patrick Zambianchi
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
DEN 310 - SLN: 11518
Instructor: Nancy White
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
THO 234 - SLN: 11519
Instructor: Petia Parpoulova
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


T
SWS - SLN: 19474
Instructor: Cuauhtemoc Mexica
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MLR 301 - SLN: 11521
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

What separates the man from the monster, the dutiful daughter from the public revolutionary, or the rebellious lover from the obedient citizen? This course explores these questions and more. The course examines the search for self in works of literature from ancient Greece (Antigone), ancient and modern India (Sakuntala), nineteenth-century England (Frankenstein), and America. The readings all highlight the acts of rebellious individuals against established social expectations, gender roles, and/or political and cultural norms. We will ask throughout the course how identities are made, and how the process of self-formation is explored by works of literature and some films.

The course is designed as an introduction to comparative literature. No prior knowledge is assumed. The course will be divided into four units, each focused on a contrasting pair of readings and a particular genre (short story, novel, drama, poem).

The major texts for this course are:
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
Sophocles, Antigone
Kalidasa, Sakuntala
Various short stories and poems available through online reserves.


MTWTh 5:30pm - 7:20pm
BAG 131 - SLN: 11526
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to film form, style, and techniques. Examples from silent film and from contemporary film. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


MTTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11537
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the history and significance of film genres from the early days of film to the present. Examines a selection of several genres, drawn from a list including western, melodrama, musical, thriller, road odyssey, film noir, and documentary. Topics include form, ideology, authority, history, innovation, and parody.


MTWTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
EEB 003 - SLN: 11538
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course surveys distinctive films and figures in the history of cinema over a period of three decades. The period spans transformations in technology (the advent of sound, color, cinemascope), genres (the musical, screwball comedy, the western, film noir, domestic melodrama), institutions (the consolidation and then the challenges to the Hollywood studio system, the birth of new national cinemas), and trends (German Expressionism, the French New Wave, Italian Neo-realism, etc.). Where possible, we will trace the migration of forms, influences and determinations across national borders. We will situate developments within a broader atlas of historical events, and geographical areas: the Great Depression and New Deal politics; the buildup to World War II and its aftermath; the paranoia of the Cold War, etc.

One of our goals will be to acquire some comparative sense of often complex and simultaneous developments in films, styles, and film industries in multiple locations during this period. A second goal, inseparable from the first, will be to develop skills necessary to approach this period as an informed and questioning historian. To that end, readings, lectures and assignments (including a mid-term and final exam) are designed to facilitate your engagement with both primary and secondary critical sources.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SAV 137 - SLN: 11539
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The course explores the cinematographic, industrial, and ideological conditions of recent filmmaking, with an emphasis on postsocialist ideology and form, new forms of realism, transnational trends, the role of international film festivals, and the revision of cinematic traditions.

During weeks 1-8, class will meet for four meetings every week-two for screenings and two for lectures. The last two weeks are devoted to watching films at the Seattle International Film Festival.

This is a core course in the film studies track. Students are expected to be familiar with basic terms in film history and criticism.


TThF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MGH 251 - SLN: 11540
Instructor: Helene Vilavella
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
RAI 116 - SLN: 19694
Instructor: Elena Deem
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Art and poetry entered into an unprecedented dialogue in the first three decades of the twentieth century when the revolutionary avant-garde movements swept through Europe. The radical stances of the avantgarde allowed for unorthodox responses to preoccupations motivated by the ever-increasing commodification of human experience which art and literature had shared for some time. Disturbing the boundaries between the two disciplines as well as between art, politics, and the general public, the avantgarde artists would reconceptualize text and image into forms which challenged classical aesthetic norms, the perceptual habits of their audience, and  the socio-cultural conditions of developed capitalism. We will examine the practices of a variety of avant-garde movements, some more and some less known, avoiding the dichotomy of margin versus center that often underpins avant-garde criticism. Besides Italy and France, we will thus venture to Spain, Czechoslovakia, and England. Our focus will be on the issues that the avant-garde opened up and tried to resolve by bringing text and image to near proximity, be it in the forms of collages, manifestos, artist books, and poem-pictures, or by a more loosely defined collaboration between poets and artists across the disciplines.
All readings will be in English.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 131 - SLN: 11541
Instructor: Naomi Sokoloff
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Major themes of Jewish life treated in modern narrative and cinema. Topics include religious tradition and modernity. Jewish immigration to America, responses to the Holocaust, Zionism, and contemporary Israel. We will draw on principles of narrative theory and film theory to compare the telling and retelling of stories in different media.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
THO 134 - SLN: 11542
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Course website: http://uwch-4.humanities.washington.edu/classes/362

The central issue in this course will be the idea of MODERNISM. The course will be a reading course, with consistent focus on making sense of texts that have often seemed puzzling to readers. Given the range (and interest) of the assigned reading, considerable emphasis will be put on the discussion sections. There will be extensive guidance for all assignments. The guiding premise is that no one can write well if they do not first attending to reading intelligently. That will be our principal concern. I am not interested in reading papers that merely indulge unsupported opinions or that have been patched together from the internet. Accordingly, all writing assignments will be short and very specifically related to reading the texts assigned. The course is cross listed, with two sections, one in Comparative Literature and the other in English: there is no difference except for department designation, course number and title. The course will carry credit for majors in both departments, as well as distribution credit (VLPA). If one section is full, sign up for the other. Please note that all lectures will be recorded and posted daily on the Web site indicated above, to allow you to review anything presented in class. Attendance is required as the fundamental condition for participation in the course, and will be a factor in your final grade. This is not a course you can take in your pajamas.

We will read works by Shakespeare, John Milton, Immanuel Kant, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Charles Baudelaire, Stephen Mallarmé, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Rainer Maria Rilke, Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Wallace Stevens, Czeslaw Milosz, and Margaret Atwood. Most selections will be short, except as noted below in the list of texts.

You will notice that the list of readings does not follow the current convention of so-called “period courses,” in which, for example, a literary “period” is defined by beginning and ending dates. In the first days of the course, the conceptual, institutional, cultural and political issues that touch this matter will be discussed directly. Here, it is important to note that what counts as “modern” has always been relative to something viewed as “traditional,” or “conventional” or “ancient.” What makes something modern, that is to say, is never entirely determined by its date of publication—nor even by its use of certain formal devices or strategies. More generally, virtually all proposed “periods” qualified in their own times as “modern” inasmuch as they presented challenges to what had come before.

In a more fundamental sense, all of the works assigned in this course count as modern in the sense that they present a challenge to the status quo, to the commonplace, to received wisdom—and in that respect, their literary and cultural function is exceptionally important by posing, repeatedly, the question of the purpose or function of literary writing. Note also that the readings are not restricted to single cultural traditions (though for practical reasons, all the readings are available in English versions).

Texts:
Please note that YOU MUST USE THE ASSIGNED EDITIONS. You can realize very significant savings by buying most of these books on line, though the editions will all be available in the University Bookstore. The course reader is required and will be available at Professional Copy and Print (42nd and University Way). A PDF version will be posted on-line.

In U Bookstore:
William Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida (Pelican Shakespeare) ISBN 0140714863
John Milton: Samson Agonistes (Crofts Classics edition) ISBN 0882950584
T. S. Eliot: Collected Poems 1909-1962 (Harcourt ) ISBN 0151189781
William Carlos Williams: Imaginations (New Directions) ISBN 0811202291
Virginia Woolf: To the Lighthouse (Oxford World Classics) ISBN 0199536619
James Joyce: Dubliners (Viking Revised, ed. Scholes & Litz) ISBN 0140247742

In the Course Reader: (Professional Copy and Print) (also on-line)
The Book of Ecclesiastes (from the King James Bible)
Clement Greenberg : “Modernist Painting”
Dieter Henrich: selection from Aesthetic Judgment and the Moral Image of the World.
Jean Jacques Rousseau: selection from Emile
Immanuel Kant : selections from Critique of the Power of Judgment
William Wordsworth: Preface to Lyrical Ballads (2nd edition)
Walt Whitman: Democratic Vistas
Franz Kafka: “Metamorphosis”, “In the Penal Colony” and selected parables
Jorge Luis Borges: “Tlon, Uqbar and Orbis Tertius,” and “The Circular Ruins”
Selected poetry & prose by
Emily Dickinson, Charles Baudelaire, Rainer Maria Rilke, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, Czeslaw Milosz, and Margaret Atwood.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
DEN 216 - SLN: 11547
Instructor: Diana Behler
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course will focus on texts that exude the aura of the “fantastic” in German, English, American, French, and Russian literature, most originating in the 19th century. We will read and discuss stories by Tieck, Hoffmann, Kleist, Mary Shelley, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Schnitzler, and Gogol that deal wi th the phenomenon of the inscrutable in life and literature. We will also draw on various theories about demonic, gothic, fantastic, and romantic imagination (e.g., Freud, Todorov) and relate them to the texts we are analyzing.

Requirements: Active participation in discussions, several short paragraphs, mid-term exam, and a final take-home exam.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
EXED 110 - SLN: 11548
Instructor: Willis Konick
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

The class will meet two hours (twice a week) on film viewing days, one hour on lecture days (twice a week). Office hours are Fridays.

TEXTS: Naguib Mahfouz, "the Theif and the Dogs," "Miramar," "Midaq Alley"
FILMS: The Ghost Writer (Roman Polanski, High and Low (Akira Kurosawa), The Lady Eve (Preston Sturges), The Usual Suspects (Bryan Singer)

THEME OF CLASS: TRANSFORMATIONS
The most wonderful things happen when we are transformed. We fall in and sometimes out of love. We fall into careers. We fall into heroic exploits, missions we never imagined. We slip into happy dreams or discontent. And then slip out again. During this quarter we will view films in which an anonymous writer becomes a hero; a clever woman pays back the man who dumped her by shifting name and social class; a wealthy manufacturer is stripped of his fortune; and a crippled fellow begins to resemble the devil himself. We shall explore the transformation of a modern nation. Egypt and its current unrest will become our topic as we turn to short fiction by Egypt's fabulous writer, Naguib Mahfouz. Finally we will learn that only transformation gives full meaning to our life in time. For when the transformation passes, affable time returns to greet us. Class assignments: two take-home essays (midquarter and final). The instructor and his assistant will offer individual help for both essays.


MW 4:30pm - 7:20pm
SAV 162 - SLN: 11556
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean

Provides a basic grounding in the theory, history, and criticism of film and media studies, and introduces central debates, topics, and methods in the field.


Summer 2011 A-term


MTWThF 12:00pm - 2:10pm
SIG 226 - SLN: 10521
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Folklore (traditional stories, beliefs, songs, and customs) is a rich source for understanding people and their worldviews. This course will survey several genres of folklore and study the people who maintain those folklore traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.


MTWThF 8:30am - 10:40am
SMI 407 - SLN: 10522
GE Requirements Met: C, W

The self constantly looks for that moment where it is the agent of its path, a moment that affirms its indissoluble autonomy and its existential freedom. That precise moment defines many a character we will examine in our readings and in the movies. In a breath of fresh air, they inhale freedom, and their actions thereon translate an evilness that cannot be dismissed, as they come face to face with their human limitations. Can we understand evil as an assertion of freedom in the face of our unwavering fate? Or is it merely a byproduct of our struggle against fate? Does committing evil become a 'collateral damage'? or the essence of that freedom? Does (self-) destruction become an automatic result? Finally, does our perception of evil differ, across time and space? In this class, we will address these issues through close reading and writings about literary, philosophical and film texts from a variety of cultural contexts: from Classical Greece to Elizabethan England to Twentieth-Century France and Egypt. We will examine how various characters in literature and film express and exercise their freedom, and how in the course of their actions, evil unfolds. Eventually, the aim of the class is to demonstrate whether we can understand evil through its relation to freedom and fate.

Required readings in order:
Sophocles. Oedipus, the King. Shakespeare, William. Othello. Camus, Albert. Caligula. Sartre, Jean-Paul. The Flies. Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Mahfouz, Naguib. The Thief and the Dogs.

Theory (available on class website):
Camus, Albert. Selections from The Rebel. ----. Selections from The Myth of Sisyphus. Freud, Sigmund. Selections from Civilization and Its Discontent. ----. Selections from The Interpretation of Dreams (on the Oedipus Complex). Nietzsche, Friedrich. Selections from On The Genealogy of Morals.

Films:
The Dark Knight (Batman). Dir. Christopher Nolan, 2008 (US). Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Dir. Kenneth Branagh, 1994 (UK).

Class assignments and grading
You will be required to write 2 short essays (2 pages) and 2 long ones (4-5 pages) and give a presentation.


MW
THO - SLN: 13948
Instructor: Yizhong Gu
GE Requirements Met: C, W

How can we understand a film from the perspective of culturally distinct audiences? How can we organize clear and cogent arguments when faced with complex human issues such as self-sacrifice? The primary goal of this writing course is to familiarize you with the basic terms and concepts of film analysis, approaches to writing analytical papers with both accuracy and poignancy, and essential procedures for peer-editing and essay revision.

Revolving around the contested concept of martyrdom, this course will also tease out specific topics in cinema studies, including nationalism, ideology construction, subject formation and gender politics. To shed light on these topics, we will alternate viewing and discussion of a few theoretical and analytical essays and major films from various cultural contexts, with discussions of strategies for writing about film. Readings will include some foundational theoretical works such as Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities and Louis Althusser's “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses.” Films will include recent Hollywood blockbusters (Flags of our Father, 2006 and Letters from Iwo Jima, 2006); European art cinema (Ivan‟s Childhood, 1962); East Asian cinema (The Assembly, 2007; Lust, Caution, 2007; and Yasukuni, 2008); and Middle Eastern cinema (Paradise Now, 2005).

The cinematic representation of martyrdom poses many questions. How is nationalism constituted in different cultural and historical contexts? How does the collective passion of sacrifice for one's nation sublimate the individual desire to sacrifice for one's lover or family? Can we clearly delineate the boundaries between martyrs (self-sacrifice) and scapegoats (those forced to sacrifice themselves)? Finally, what makes us take for granted the necessity of martyrs' voluntary self-sacrifice for the nation?

Coursework will include four papers (two short, two long), as well as two oral presentations for each student.


MTWThF 10:50am - 1:00pm
SAV 169 - SLN: 13949
Instructor: Milan Vidakovic
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Even after we‟ve seen them sing, dress dapperly, and carry on conversations that most literature majors would give their right arm to be able to emulate, do we still think of Bugs Bunny or White Rabbit as bunnies? This summer, we will cover a variety of novels and short stories that prominently feature animals, looking into how their images morph within fantastical realms. You might have heard of some basic plot strategies, such as conflict, crisis, peripeteia, and recognition; or you may have learned about literary devices such as pastiche, allusion and parody. If you haven't, you will now; if you have, you will have the opportunity to refresh your memory and learn more about them. Then we will do some serious literary analysis (read: writing) about animals in these somewhat weird-sounding literary situations.

Tentative reading list:
Greek myths: a selection, Aesop fables: a selection, Medieval bestiaries: a selection, Lewis Carroll: Alice in Wonderland, Jorge Luis Borges: Book of Imaginary Beings, Terry Pratchett: Witches Abroad, and David Sedaris: Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk. Secondary readings (discussions of issues addressed in fictional works we read) will be drawn mostly from Richard Bulliet‟s Hunters, Herders and Hamburgers.

This class is a combination of a reading-intensive course and a writing workshop, so most time we will spend working on these two skills. If you have not taken a literature or a writing class at UW, you will be relieved to know that fancy phrases and highfalutin words are neither expected nor welcome; you will practice deploying textual evidence, analyzing it critically, and writing in a no-nonsense style that you can later apply in other areas of your study and life.

There will be three major papers of 3-6 pages, and daily short writing assignments. We will organize study/writing groups every day after class to help you keep up with this considerable amount of work, so make sure to leave some time in your schedule in the afternoons. Required readings are available on a variety of media: in print, as audio books (CDs/audio files), or online. It is up to you which medium you use, but in your papers you will be expected to quote from either books or online sources, so make sure you have access to them. In early June, I will send out a group email with the finalized reading list so that you will have enough time to get hold of the readings before the class starts.

Passing this class with a grade of 2.0 or higher fulfills the 5-credit English composition (C) requirement, or half of the 10-credit Additional Writing (W) requirement.


MTThF 2:20pm - 4:30pm
SAV 156 - SLN: 10527
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MTWTh 10:50am - 1:00pm
DEN 217 - SLN: 10528
Instructor: Henry J. Staten
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

We will read a variety of poems and fictional works from France, Germany, England, and the U.S. in order to get a sense of the complex phenomenon called “modernism.” Modernism is a style, or cluster of styles, of writing that flourished from roughly 1910-1930, but the beginnings of which can be traced to France in the mid-19th century. There is no simple definition of what “modernism” means; like other period terms in literary theory (e.g., “romanticism” or “realism”), it refers not to any single quality of literary works but to a diverse set of stylistic characteristics, which get mixed and matched differently by different authors. The only way to get a sense of how the term works is to read a number of texts that are labeled with it and see how they are similar and how they are different.

I don‟t expect you to already know how to read poetry; one of my main goals in this class is to teach you how to do it. I will provide you with a “tool box” of techniques by which to break poems down into understandable language. Then, in the second half of the course, we will work on a comparable tool box for fiction.

There will be a 2-3 page paper on Baudelaire due the second week (worth 20% of your grade); a 4-5 page mid-term paper on Rilke and Eliot (40 %); and a final, 4-5 page, paper on modernist fiction (40%). Your entire grade will be based on these three papers.

We will spend the first half of the course reading the work of three poets, the second half the work of three prose writers, as follows:
Poems:
Baudelaire, poems (xerox)
Rilke, poems (xerox)
Eliot, Selected Poems
Kafka, The Metamorphosis
Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
Gide, The Counterfeiters
The work of Baudelaire and Rilke will be available in a course packet from the Ave. Copy Center, 4141 University Way (known as “the Ave.”). It‟s below street level, located beneath the University Credit Union. The other texts (Metamorphosis, Mrs. Dalloway, and The Counterfeiters) will be available at the University Bookstore. I strongly recommend you buy the editions that I‟ve ordered for you; otherwise you won‟t have the same page numbers, and it will be hard for you to follow class discussion of the text.


MTWTh 9:40am - 11:50am
SAV 140 - SLN: 10529
Instructor: José Alaniz
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

If, as the author Christopher Hedges has claimed, “War is a force that gives us meaning,” how have artists communicated and shaped that meaning? And what meanings have been communicated? This course examines war as a subject of ideology, protest and representation. We will investigate how authors have defined and depicted war in Western civilization, from Homer‟s epic poetry to Shakespeare‟s nationalist rallying cries to Hollywood‟s widescreen blockbusters. At every point we will acknowledge both war‟s allures and its costs, with emphasis on the role played by masculinity in the long history of representing human conflict. Authors include Homer, William Shakespeare, Stephen Crane, Isaak Babel and Jacques Tardi. All course readings and viewings in English.


TTh 1:10pm - 4:30pm
DEN 312 - SLN: 14196
Instructor: Nicole Calian
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Offered by visitors or resident faculty. Content varies.


Summer 2011 B-term


MTWThF 8:30am - 10:40am
LOW 217 - SLN: 10523
Instructor: Greta D'Amico
GE Requirements Met: C, W

This course is designed to help students become engaged, proficient readers and writers through a comparative approach to literature. Our readings will focus upon the human-environmental dynamic from both romantic and contemporary ecological perspectives, with particular, though not exclusive, emphasis upon feminine representation, subjectivity, and experience in nature and its counterpart, society. We will examine the relationship between nature, social formation, emotional and physical vulnerability, and the inhabited environment. Through our readings we will consider precedents and inherent problems in the romantic idea of Man in harmony with nature, particularly with regard to such significant influences as pre- and post-industrialism, Darwinian thought, colonialism, and war. In what ways, for instance, do female, as well as less traditionally susceptible male protagonists, influence or alter our perceptions of humanity in the changing natural environment, both yesterday and today? Supplementary readings will include writings from the field of ecocriticism, including feminist and psychological perspectives, with small amounts of physical and cultural anthropology (Jane Goodall and Mary Douglas, for example) thrown into the mix. Classroom time will focus upon close reading and discussion of the texts, weekly intensive, workshop-style writing laboratories, group and peer editing. You will produce three short papers and two group oral presentations during the quarter.

Required Texts:
Claire de Duras, Ourika (John Fowles, trans. 1995); George Sand, Indiana (Sylvia Raphael, trans. 2001); Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders (1998); Kazuo Ishiguro, A Pale View of Hills (1990); Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (1998) Short stories will include the work of Flannery O'Connor, Joyce Carol Oates, and Sherwood Anderson, among others.

Student learning goals
Students will learn requirements and skills of analytic writing involving one or several literary texts.
How to develop individual paragraphs and structure beginnings, middles, and ends, to create a cohesive, articulate essay.
How to edit your own essays and work with others to improve drafts.
How to read closely, compare, and interpret a variety of texts.
How to develop and articulate ideas through writing.
How to become more comfortable discussing interpretations, ideas and questions in a classroom setting.


MTWThF 9:40am - 11:50am
SAV 168 - SLN: 13950
Instructor: Or Rogovin
GE Requirements Met: C, W

C LIT 240 introduces students to the writing of critical essays in the discipline of Comparative Literature. It aims to develop writing and critical skills through a variety of discussion, group-work, and writing assignments. This section focuses on the theme of crisis and identity in modern Jewish fiction with much attention to the narrative techniques applied in its communication. The writers are Jewish by birth but their writing - in different ways and degrees - deals with universal problems: ethnic or religious identity and commitment to it; the power of religious faith; immigration and immersion; familial problems and confrontation; personal development and demise; weak men and powerful women. We will be reading in English translation stories and novellas by twentieth century Jewish writers from different cultures and continents: Berkowitz (Hebrew), Roth (English), Singer (Yiddish), Kafka (German), Appelfeld (Hebrew), and Bellow (English). The ultimate goal is to produce an interesting, precise, well-grounded, and well-articulated analysis of literary texts while making use of the approaches and techniques of Comparative Literature.

General method of instruction
Lectures, class discussion, group work.

Recommended preparation
No association with Judasim or knowledge of Jewish culture is assumed or required. An interest in literature is recommended.

Class assignments and grading
Reading tasks, quizzes, short writing assignments,response papers and longer essays.
Grades will be based on class participation, punctual attendance, on-time submission of writing assignments and papers.


MTWThF 10:50am - 1:00pm
PCAR 291 - SLN: 13951
Instructor: Artur Rosman
GE Requirements Met: C, W

This course is an introduction to film analysis and writing about films. The course will help students analyze film form and style, develop arguments, evaluate their own writing as well as that of their own colleagues, and use feedback to revise their drafts.
We will learn how to create persuasive arguments, which means learning how to turn initial responses into specific, arguable claims. We will also learn how to support those claims with appropriate evidence, and then place those claims in conversation with other scholars and writers.

The course is designed with the premise that writing is a process and furthermore, it is a powerful mode of learning, thinking, and communicating. Writing, and being self-aware of ourselves as writers, is an activity that allows us to pose questions, clarify thoughts, and make connections we would not otherwise.

Films and film clips will be wide-ranging in style, genre, period, and may include films like Sherlock, Jr, Rope, Blue Velvet, Don't Look Now, The Conversation, Dawn of the Dead.

The course does not require any prior knowledge of film analysis.

Student learning goals
Learn, through writing, about film studies as a discipline.
See writing as a process which requires us to revise our written work as well as our ideas
Write thoughtfully and persuasively about the texts we read and the films we view by creating and defending complex, narrowly defined, arguable claims.

General method of instruction
lecture, discussion, screening

Recommended preparation
No prior knowledge of film is necessary for this course.


MTWTh 12:00pm - 2:10pm
GWN 201 - SLN: 10524
Instructor: Willis Konick
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Introduction to authorship in the cinema. The work of a major director or directors. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


MTWTh 2:20pm - 4:50pm
THO 101 - SLN: 10525
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Overview of the main conceptual problems in film criticism such as: "What is a film?", "What is the relationship between film and reality?", "Does a film have a language?", "What is the connection between image and sound?" Follows a historical timeline within five individual sections.


MTWTh 10:50am - 1:00pm
MLR 301 - SLN: 10526
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

An analysis of eight films from Latin America that address two major issues in late twentieth-century politics, revolution and dictatorship: the 1960s ideal of the „New Man‟ and the corresponding social movements, including the Cuban Revolution; and the dictatorships and repression in Chile and Argentina during the 1970s and 1980s. Genres include the biopic, the political thriller, family melodrama, the road movie, and the coming of age film. We will screen the films on Mondays and Wednesdays and discuss them and related readings on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Your success in the class will depend on regular attendance and participation. You will write two short (three-to-four-page) analytical essays, based on close readings of the films and texts and library research; and keep a diary of the films and readings. Students enrolled in the Spanish portion of the course should read, write and do their research in Spanish.

Texts: Ernesto Che Guevara, The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey. Ocean Press, 2003, 175 pp. ISBN 1876175702 OR Diarios de motocicleta: Notas de viaje. Ocean Press, 2004, 200 pp; essay packet.

Films: Los diarios de motocicleta/The Motorcycle Diaries (Brazil, 2004). Dir. Walter Salles. Universal, 2005; Che. Dir. Steven Soderbergh. Irvington, NY: Criterion Collection, 2009; Missing. Dir. Costa-Gavras. New York: Criterion Collection, 2008;
Machuca. Dir. Andres Wood. Venice, CA: Menemsha Films, 2007; La historia oficial / The Official Story. Dir. Luis Puenzo. Port Washington, NY: Koch Lorber Films, 2004;
Cronica de un escape / Chronicle of an Escape. Dir. Israel Adrian Caetano. Santa Monica, CA: Genius Products, 2008; Kamchatka (Argentina, 2002). Dir. Marcelo Pinero. Argentina AVH, 2007; Cautiva. Dir. Gaston Biraben. Port Washington, NY: Koch Entertainment, 2007.


MTWTh 10:50am - 1:00pm
THO 125 - SLN: 14274
Instructor: Carol Edelman Warrior
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


Autumn 2011


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MEB 238 - SLN: 21254
Instructor: Michael Shapiro
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to ancient and classical Indian literature in its cultural context. Texts in English translation.

Students can be expected to gain a general familiarity with some of the major texts of Indian (i.e., South Asian) tradition and civilization. These texts span the period from the middle of the second millennium BCE to the end of the first millennium CE. Texts to be read and discussed include the Rig Veda, the Mahabharata and Bhagavadgita, the Pancatantra, drama and poetry by Kalidasa, and early South Asian lyric poetry. Because this is a "W" course, students will gain practice in writing analytical essays on assigned texts.

The most effective technique for success in this course is to read the assigned texts carefully. The course has no formal prerequisites. But students should be prepared to read assigned texts, to discuss them, and to think and write critically about them.

Weekly reading assigments. Weekly study guides with discussion questions.

Midterm examination (20%); final examination (30%); 8-10 page analytic paper (35%); class participation and preparation (15%).


MTWTh 11:30am - 12:20pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 11582
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Folklore (traditional stories, beliefs, songs, and customs) is a rich source for understanding people and their worldviews. This course will survey several genres of folklore and study the people who maintain those folklore traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
MLR 302A - SLN: 11584
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF
MGH - SLN: 11585
Instructor: Anagha Hastings
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
CMU 228 - SLN: 11587
Instructor: Nobuko Yamasaki
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
LOW 217 - SLN: 11588
Instructor: Laura Eshleman
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
CMU 243 - SLN: 11589
Instructor: Sima Daad
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 5:30pm - 6:20pm
SAV 158 - SLN: 20712
Instructor: Max Maier
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
PCAR 293 - SLN: 21021
Instructor: Elena Deem
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 20740
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature and its relation to culture. The principal focus is on reading great books, all of historical importance and continuing interest.

The main texts-- Shakespeare's King Lear, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, and Leo Tolstoi's Anna Karenina. These books will be supplemented by shorter texts, including poetry and prose.

The course has no prerequisites, and carries both VLPA distribution credit and "W" course credit. The selected texts will be read in English.

There will be three writing assignments (typically 3-5 pages), each of which can be revised, and an optional final paper (typically 3-7 pages). Students who complete all four papers will earn W credit.

Students may opt to take a final examination instead of writing the final paper.

In addition, there will be a short weekly quiz on assigned reading. These are short (taking only about 5 minutes), on details from the reading material for the week.

Required written assignments: 60%; The final paper or final exam: 15%; Participation (incl. attendance): 15% Weekly quizzes: 10%


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
KNE 210 - SLN: 11590
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

How did martial arts grow into a popular genre in fiction and film, and how did the genre become a worldwide craze? How do martial arts movies comment on East Asian and North American cultures? The course examines the formation of literary and cinematic conventions of martial arts films, the history of their production in countries such as China, Hong Kong and Japan, and their ideological background. In addition to offering an introduction to filmic technique and Asian popular media, the course dwells on the importance of visual and bodily  perception, gender constructions, and intercultural translation.


M
MGH - SLN: 11601
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.

This course will offer an introduction to the ways in which film criticism has interrogated the basic elements of film language - narrative structures, editing, mise-en-scene, cinematography and sound. Our aim is two fold. First, by the end of the quarter, you should be fully versed in the vocabulary and terms that constitute the language of film, and be able to analyze and interpret films using that vocabulary. Second, you should also be able to grasp the role the elements of film language have played in formulating core arguments and shaping important trends and schools of thought in the history of film criticism. We want to pursue a close analysis of the films we watch and understand the stakes of doing so. But we also want to familiarize ourselves with the way film criticism itself has taken up the task of
close analysis.

Some of the other questions we will ask include the following: How can film editing prescribe and proscribe viewing positions for us as spectators, transforming us into political and politicized subjects? What do the debates in classical film theory between proponents of montage and mise-en-scene have to tell us about presuppositions about the nature of film as a medium? What critical opinions and anxieties have been provoked about the relevance and nature of the cinematic medium because of technological transformations such as sound, widescreen, and digital media?

Grading will be based on essay-length close analysis of films, shorter responses to films screened, as well as contributions to more participatory discussion-based exercises.


M
SAV - SLN: 11604
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course focuses on the effects on Italian cinema of the spread of commercial television in Italy in the mid-seventies. Since the beginning (1954), Italian television had been primarily an educational tool in the hands of the State. Programming was primarily focused on elevating the masses from a level of ignorance and disinformation, almost unknown in other parts of Europe (in post war Italy, illiteracy was still a huge problem, especially in large areas of the South).

Daily television shows included TV news, documentaries, drama and classical concerts. The only forms of entertainment were the weekly feature movie and quiz show. There were no commercial interruptions during the shows and commercials were actually grouped altogether in a ten minute special evening interruption. Obviously this kind of television was not in competition with cinema. Everything changed in 1975 when a number of privately owned channels were allowed to broadcast at a local level. These channels were proposing programs that focused only on entertainment (sports, movies, soap operas, quiz shows, etc.) and consequently both RAI, the state owned television, and cinema had to start facing the aggressive competition of these new channels.

In this course, we will first pay attention to the way in which cinema reacted to the invasion of commercial television and then we will analyze the work of two film-makers (Gianni Amelio and Fernan Ozpetek) who grew up in the new cultural environment of the '70‘s and analyze whether their movies have been influenced by the new kind of narration that commercial television imposed on audiences through soap operas, TV movies and TV series.

The concurrent NICE film festival in November at SIFF will allow us to screen some very recent (2010-2011) movies by first-time directors and continue the discussion on the influence of television on the youngest generation. Attendance to the festival is mandatory.


MW
JHN - SLN: 11606
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Is Bollywood all there is to Indian cinema? This course is an introduction to Indian cinema, or more appropriately, the many cinemas of India. Spend 10 weeks watching great Indian movie classics and new surprises - violent urban gangster films, morbidly humorous films about youth cyber culture, unlikely Shakespeare adaptations, Paris as an exotic and distant city, inventive new sports comedies, to name just a few themes.

Our introduction will be structured thematically around broad ideas - nationalism and Indian cinema; film and mass media; film and the urban experience; cinema and globalization; film as art practice. Where possible, we will also explore the relation between film and other kinds of mages - popular film posters, lithographed, religious calendar images, photography, traveling slide show exhibitors.

Movies will be in Indian languages and subtitled in English. Titles include: LSD: Love Sex aur Dhoka (Love, Sex and Betrayal, 2010, English/Hindi); Satya (Truth, 1998, Hindi), Pyaasa (Thirst, 1957, Hindi/Urdu), Chennai 600028 (2008, Tamil), An Evening in Paris (1967, Hindi), Pather Panchali (Song of the Little Road, 1957, Bengali), Harishchandrachi Factory (Harishchandra's Factory, 2009, Marathi).

Course work includes one screening and two lecture sessions a week. Readings will be drawn mainly from film studies but will include scholarship from other disciplines such as art history, anthropology, urban theory and sociology.

Grading will draw on short response papers, a longer term-end essay and participation.


MWF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
SAV 137 - SLN: 21078
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The UN estimates the urban population in the Middle East and North Africa (M.E.N.A) will reach 430 million by 2020. 280 million, over 65%, are expected to live in urban environments. This course will examine how filmmakers in the region have been grappling with this phenomenon and how film, as a medium, can illuminate the experience of social existence en masse. The class will center on key films from the Twenty-First Century about life in four of the largest metropolises in the region: Casablanca, Cairo, Tel Aviv and Tehran. Students will be expected to view the films, in their entirety, either during special screening hours or independently. Readings and additional screening material will accompany each film. Assignments will include two papers and a final presentation.

Ali Zaoua (2000, Morocco), Nabil Ayouch
Ten (2002, Iran), Abbas Kiarostami
Or (2004, Israel), Keren Yedaya
Yacoubian Building (2006, Egypt), Marwan Hamed


MW 2:30pm - 4:20pm
MGH 241 - SLN: 11607
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Contemporary fiction by Czech, East German, Hungarian, Polish, Baltic, and Balkan writers. Topics include: history of colonization, the imagination of social utopia, socialism and nationalism, everyday life under communism, cultural identify between East and West, experimental writing, new fiction in post-communist Eastern Europe. All readings in English.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
GLD 435 - SLN: 20545
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

"What is found here is to be found elsewhere too... but what is not found here is to be found nowhere."
    - The Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva

This course considers masterpieces of story literature from India and surrounding regions, with focus on The Mahābhārata, A Tale of Four Dervishes, and The Arabian Nights. Each of these texts has had wide influence on Eastern and Western literatures and continues to inspire rich performance and literary traditions today. We will discuss the impact of indigenous and external sources on the major texts, their treatment of universal themes such as curiosity and fate, and narrative theory and structure. All works will be read in English translation, and no prior knowledge is assumed.

The major texts for this course are:
The Mahabharata, translated by Chakravarti V. Narasimhan
A Tale of Four Dervishes (Bāgh o Bahār), by Mir Amman
The Arabian Nights, translated by Husain Haddawy


MW 9:30am - 11:20am
SMI 309 - SLN: 11608
Instructor: Míċeál Vaughan
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

At the end of the fourteenth century, the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer produced, among his last works, a collection of narratives he called "Seintes Legende of Cupide." Alternatively titled The Legend of Good Women, the collection contains stories about a dozen ancient women (and their men), e.g., Cleopatra, Dido, Thisbe, Medea, to mention a few. A close reading of the Legend reveals how Chaucer‘s late-medieval narratives about these classical heroines have been influenced by genres like the Christian saint‘s life and the traditions of so-called "courtly love." The tensions between the ideals of Christian hagiography and courtly romance lend a lively complexity to his stories, and to their interpretation. This course will attempt to define these competing ideals by discussing literary examples from ancient times -- in the Old Testament (e.g., the books of Ruth, Judith, and Esther) and Ovid‘s Heroides -- through the Middle ages, with its rich range of saints lives, retellings of Ovid, and classic works like the Romance of the Rose, Dante‘s Vita Nuova, and Boccaccio‘s Famous Women. After looking at Juan Ruiz‘s Book of Good Love, we‘ll turn to Chaucer‘s Legend (and perhaps some of his other works), and conclude with his near-contemporary, Christine de Pizan, esp. her Book of the City of Ladies.

Requirements for the course will include active participation in discussions, weekly short writing contributions (response papers), and two longer (4-5pp) papers.


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