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C LIT 250 B: Introduction to Comparative Literature: Literature and Culture

Meeting Time: 
TTh 4:30pm - 6:20pm
Location: 
SMI 211
SLN: 
22965
Joint Sections: 
JSIS B 312 A, GWSS 390 D
Instructor: 
Nektaria G. Klapaki

Syllabus Description:

JSIS B 312 A - CLIT 250 B - GWSS 390 D

Autumn Quarter 2021

5 credits 

Money, Love and Marriage:

Women in Europe, America, and the Mediterranean

1820-Country-Wedding.jpg  

Professor: Nektaria Klapaki

Email: nklapaki@uw.edu

Class Schedule: T/Th, 4:30-6:20 PM (SMI 211)

Office: Thomson 426

Office Hours (via Zoom): Th, 3:15-4:15 PM (Pacific Time) & by appointment

Zoom link:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/2656597688?pwd=MFJybXhoTVM5M3JJaXVxWG0ybmNZQT09

Meeting ID: 265 659 7688
Passcode: Klapaki1@#

 

Course Description

Marriage for love or money?  The age-old clash between a romantic version of marriage versus one based on economic considerations captures a range of key issues including, among others, gender and class relations, feminist and patriarchal ideology, the relationship between desire, marriage and capital/power.  Inspired by these questions, the course discusses them from interdisciplinary standpoints by drawing on seminal texts in the fields of literature, history, anthropology, gender, feminist literary criticism and cultural studies.  Spanning across modern Europe (late 18th- and early 19th-century England), America (mid 19th-century New York) and the Mediterranean (late 19th- and early 20th-century Greece), the course has a broad chronological and geographical scope with a focus on three case studies.  We discuss some major literary works (and their film adaptations) that illustrate the relations between desire, capital and the institution of marriage: Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Henry James’s Washington Square, and Konstantinos Theotokis’s Honor and Love.  The course examines such topics as: forms of marriage payments; marriage as a form of patriarchal exchange; commodification of men and women in the marriage market; women and property rights; marriage settlements; legal system of coverture; the marriage plot of the 19th-century Anglo-American novel; the trope of the blazon in the courtship novel; money and dowries as symbols of attitudes toward women and marriage; women and property versus women as property; the relationship between women’s agency and their prominence in the novel; the relation of dowries to economic and social mobility; the relationship between women, wealth and desire in the 19th-century Anglo-American and the Greek 20th-century novel.

 

Course Learning Objectives

This course will:

  • Help students familiarize themselves with major themes in the history of marriage and dowry, and in the history of gender relations
  • Introduce students to important texts in the Anglo-American and Greek novelistic traditions that deal with the relationship between gender, marriage, desire and capital
  • Enable students understand the relation between patriarchal and feminist ideology and gender relations
  • Help students strengthen their critical and analytical skills

 

Required Reading and Other Material

  • A series of articles (available on Canvas)
  • Two novels in English (available in electronic format through the UW Libraries)
  • Excerpts from a Modern Greek novel translated into English (available on Canvas)
  • A series of films and other audio-visual material to watch during class
  • Please note that in the Bibliography comprises some additional articles and book chapters, other than the required ones in the Course Schedule and Readings section. All the additional articles and book chapters are completely OPTIONAL for you to read if you are interested in learning more about the topics discussed in the class. They are not required for the class.

 

Class Assignments and Grading

  • Two in-class quizzes through Canvas: 20% each (a study guide will be provided ahead of time)
  • One take-home midterm exam: 30% (a study guide will be provided ahead of time)
  • One in-class final exam: 30% (a study guide will be provided ahead of time).

 

Grade scale

The following grade scale will be used to convert percentages to GPA points:

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

74

2.1

100-95

4.0

73

2.0

94

3.9

72

1.9

93

3.8

71

1.8

92

3.7

70

1.7

91

3.6

69

1.6

90-89

3.5

68

1.5

88-87

3.4

67

1.4

86

3.3

66

1.3

85

3.2

65

1.2

84

3.1

64

1.1

83

3.0

63

1.0

82

2.9

62

0.9

81

2.8

61

0.8

80

2.7

60

0.7

79

2.6

59 and x < 59

0.0

78

2.5

 

 

77

2.4

 

 

76

2.3

 

 

75

2.2

 

 

 

General Method of Instruction and Other Important Information regarding communication with Professor Klapaki

 

  • Masks or face coverings in classroom: Masks are required inside all UW buildings and facilities, including classrooms. Students are required to wear a mask or face covering while they are in the classroom in compliance with UW rules.
  • Potential disruptions to in-person teaching: In case I experience COVID symptoms, I get sick or need to quarantine due to exposure, you will be notified via email and through Canvas. I will then let you know if another instructor will step in to take over the class temporarily or if I will continue to teach the class via Zoom temporarily until I am able to resume in-person instruction. The teaching modality of the class might also have to temporarily change to online in case someone in the class becomes infected with COVID. Again, you will be notified accordingly ahead of time.
  • Method of instruction: Lecture and discussion.
  • Missing a class: If you miss a class, please make sure you get notes from another student, and then set up an appointment to consult with me, should you have any questions about the material covered in the lecture. It is your responsibility to stay connected, informed and up-to-date on class materials, assignments and due dates.
  • Missing a quiz or exam: If you cannot take a quiz or exam because of a verified illness, a personal or family emergency, please notify me as soon as possible.
  • Late assignment submission: Extensions will be granted only in cases of verified emergencies. Late assignments will suffer a drop in grade by 0.5 per day (for example, from a 4.0 to a 3.5)
  • Plagiarism and Academic Integrity: Please read carefully and closely abide by the Student Conduct Code (see end of the syllabus).
  • Class website: I will maintain a class website on Canvas, where you will find uploaded the required readings (indicated in the course schedule accordingly). All the information you need for the class will be available on Canvas, which you should be checking regularly. Also, you should be checking regularly your UW email, as I will be sending class notifications, alongside through Canvas.
  • Course syllabus: I retain the right to make changes to the course readings. I treat the syllabus as a “living document” that can evolve and change, depending on the specific needs of the class. Should I decide to do make any changes, you will be notified ahead of time.
  • Office hours: I will hold my office hours on Thursdays between 3:15-4:15PM (Pacific Time) and I will be available to talk via Zoom. If you cannot make it during the above office hours, please email me to schedule an appointment at a mutually convenient date and time.
  • Class break: A short break will be provided halfway through the class.
  • Technology resources: Regarding the use of technology, there are a lot of online resources to learn about the technologies we will be using for this class. I will post links to some of these resources on the Canvas website of the course. You can always seek help from classmates, UW workshops etc.  Please remember that we are all learning in terms of how to be improving our skills of technology use, so try to be patient, understanding but also determined.

 

Course Schedule and Readings

 

  1. SEPT 30 Introduction to the course

 

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

 

  1. OCT 5 Marriage payments and the marriage bargain

JANE AUSTEN

 

  1. OCT 7 The commodification of wo/men in the marriage market
  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 1-20.

The entire book (above edition) is available in electronic format through the UW Libraries. You can read it online or you can download and read it offline.

https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/courtship-love-and-marriage-in-jane-austens-novels

 

  1. OCT 12 Fortune, class, family: real and symbolic commodities in the English marriage market (i)
  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 21-40.
  • Powerpoint presentation here: 10-12-21.pptx 

https://reginajeffers.blog/2021/01/22/in-the-regency-a-widows-stipend-jointures-dower-settlements-and-dowry-which-is-which/

https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/videos/jane-austen-class-and-marriage

 

***1st Take-Home Quiz via Canvas***

Quiz will be available to take on Canvas on 10.12.21 between 6:00 AM - 11:59 PM 

 

  1. OCT 14 Fortune, class, family: real and symbolic commodities in the English marriage market (ii)

 

  1. OCT 19 Women’s virtue and beauty: symbolic commodities in the English marriage market
  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York, NY: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 41-52.

https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/videos/gender-in-19th-century-britain

https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/videos/jane-austen-gender-and-morality

 

  1. OCT 21 The courtship novel: from the marriage bargain to the companionate marriage

Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York, NY: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 53-61.

 

  1. OCT 26 Film screening
  • Joe Wright (dir.), Pride and Prejudice, 2005

 

  1. OCT 28 No class meeting***Take-Home Midterm Exam**: will be available to take on Canvas on 10.28.21 between 6:00 AM - 11:59 PM

 

HENRY JAMES

 

  1. NOV 2 The marriage bargain and the system of patriarchal exchange in 19th-century US
  • Henry James, Washington Square (New York, NY: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 1-10.

The entire book (edition indicated above) is available in electronic format through the UW Libraries. You can read it online or you can download and read it offline.

 

  1. NOV 4 Misalliances: the 19th-century American heiress and the fortune-hunter

 

  1. NOV 9 Women’s Rights: critique of patriarchy and the marriage bargain in 19th-century US

 

  1. NOV 16 Possibilities of emancipation from the marriage bargain in 19th-century US: the “spinster”
  • Henry James, Washington Square (New York, NY: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016). Please come to the class having read chapters 30-35.
  • Braun Rosenthal 2002: TBD

 

***2nd Quiz in class via Canvas***

Between 4:30 - 5:20 PM

 

  1. NOV 18 Film screening
  • William Wyler (dir.), The Heiress, 1949

 

KONSTANTINOS THEOTOKIS

 

  1. NOV 23 Women’s honor, beauty and dowry: symbolic and real commodities in the modern Greek marriage market

Excerpts of Theotokis’s “Honor and Money” translated in English by the instructor (Canvas) here: Translation_Theotokis_Honor and Money.pdf 

 

  1. NOV 30 Dowries and the marriage market in modern Greece

 

  1. DEC 2 Cash endowments in 19th-century Athens
  • Cassia and Bada 1992: 80-103 (Canvas)

 

  1. 18. DEC 7 Trousseaux in 19th-century Athens
  • Cassia and Bada 1992: 103-135 (Canvas)

https://www.benaki.org/virtual/kentriko/ground_floor/index_en.html

 

  1. DEC 9 From trousseaux to cash: changing attitudes towards women in 20th-century rural Greece

https://www.benaki.org/virtual/kentriko/ground_floor/index_en.html

 

Finals Week (DEC 11-17):

***Final in-class exam***:

Fri, Dec 17, 2021, 4:30 – 6:20 PM, SMI 221

 

Bibliography

 

Peter Allen, “Female Inheritance, Housing and Urbanization”, Anthropology, 10/1 (1986): 1-17.

Siwan Anderson, ‘The Economics of Dowry and Brideprice’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 21, no. 4, (2007): 151-174.

Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York, NY.: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016).

Françoise Basch, ‘Women’s Rights and the Wrongs of Marriage in Mid-Nineteenth Century America’, History Workshop, no 22, Autumn 1986, pp. 18-40.

Roderick Beaton, An Introduction to Modern Greek Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), pp. 103-106.

Ian F. A. Bell, Washington Square: Styles of Money (New York: Twayne Publishers, 1993), pp. 42-65.

Leonardo Buonomo, ‘Material Boy: Morris Townsend and the Lure of Comfort in Washington Square’, The Henry James Review 40 (2019): 30-44.

Joseph Allen Boone, Tradition, Counter-Tradition: Love and the Form of Fiction (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1987), pp. 1-20.

Juliet du Boulay, ‘The Meaning of Dowry: Changing Values in Rural Greece’, Journal of Modern Greek Studies Vol. 1. No. 1, 1983, pp. 243-270.

Paul Sant Cassia and Constantina Bada, The Making of the Modern Greek Family: Marriage and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century Athens (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).

Christopher Clay, ‘Marriage, Inheritance, and the Rise of Large Estates in England, 1660-1815’, The Economic History Review, New Series 21/3 (Dec. 1968): 503-518.

Babis Dermitzakis, ‘Honour and Shame in the Work of Constantinos Theotokis’, Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, (1998): 554-559.

Donna Dickenson, Property in the Body: Feminist Perspectives (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), pp. 26-57.

Evdoxios Doxiadis, The Shackles of Modernity: Women, Property, and the Transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Greek State (1750-1850) (Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, 2011), pp. 1-33, 35-77.

Jill Dubisch, Gender & Power in Rural Greece (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986), pp. 3-41.

Bo-Lennart Eklund, ‘The Socialism of Constantinos Theotokis: An Analysis Based on the Concepts timi and xrima in Two of his Works’, Scandinavian Studies in Modern Greeek, 1978, pp. 3-27.

Alexis Franghiadis, ‘Dowry, Capital Accumulation and Social Reproduction in 19th-Century Greek Agriculture’, Melanges de l’Ecole francaise de Rome. Italie et Mediterranee, 1998, volume 110, No. 1, pp. 187-192.

Jack Goody, The European Family. An Historico-Anthropological Essay (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 86-99.

Katherine Sobba Green, The Courtship Novel, 1740-1820: A Feminized Genre (Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky, 1991), pp. 69-79, 153-160.

Katrina Honeyman, Women, Gender and Industrialisation in England, 1700-1870 (London: Macmillan Press, 2000), pp. 51-71.

Diane Owen Hughes, ‘From Brideprice to Dowry in Mediterranean Europe’, in Marion A. Kaplan (ed.), The Marriage Bargain: Women and Dowries in European History (New York: Harrington Park Press, 1985), pp. 13-58.

Michael Herzfeld, “Within and Without: The Category of ‘Female’ in the Ethnography of Modern Greece.” In J. Dubisch (ed.) Gender and Power in Rural Greece (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986), pp. 215-34.

Michael Hertzfeld, ‘The Dowry in Greece: Terminological Usage and Historical Reconstruction’, Ethnohistory, 27/3 (1980): 225-41.

Renee Hirschon, ‘Property, Power and Gender Relations’, in R. Hirschon (ed.), “Women and Property-Women as Property.” (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1984), pp. 1-22.

Katie Holmes, ‘“Spinsters Indispensable”: Feminists, Single Women and the Critique of Marriage, 1890-1920’, Australian Historical Studies 29/110 (1998): 68-90.

Henry James, Washington Square (New York, NY.: Open Road Integrated Media, Inc., 2016).

Hazel Jones, Jane Austen and Marriage (London: Continuum, 2009), pp. 7-41.

Jane Lambiri-Dimaki, ‘Dowry in Modern Greece: An Institution at the Crossroads Between Persistence and Decline’, in Marion A. Kaplan (ed.), The Marriage Bargain: Women and Dowries in European History (New York: Harrington Park Press, 1985), pp. 165-178.

Peggy McCormack, The Rule of Money: Gender, Class, and Exchange Economics in the Fiction of Henry James (Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press, 1990), pp. 1-7.

Elsie B. Michie, The Vulgar Question of Money: Heiress, Materialism and the Novel of Manners from Jane Austen to Henry James (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), pp. 1-25, 26-40.

Maureen E. Montgomery, Gilded Prostitution: Status, Money, and Transatlantic Marriages, 1870-1914 (London: Routledge 2013), pp. 137-159.

Anne Phillips, Our Bodies, Whose Property? (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013), pp. 18-41.

Naomi Braun Rosenthal, Spinster Tales and Womanly Possibilities (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2002).

Ingrid H. Tague, ‘Love, Honor, and Obedience: Fashionable Women and the Discourse of Marriage in the Early Eighteenth Century’, Journal of British Studies 40/1 (Jan. 2001): 76-106.

Vern Wagner “Henry James: Money and Sex”, The Sewanee Review, vol. 93. No. 2, Spring 1985, pp. 216-231.

 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON INFORMATION ON POLICIES, RULES, RESOURCES, COURSES, GRADING, ACADEMIC CONDUCT

 

Accessibility policies

If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course. If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions. Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS. It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law. Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW's policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at Religious Accommodations Policy (https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodation...). Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the Religious Accommodations Request form (https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/).

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as the use of creations, ideas or words of publicly available work without formally acknowledging the author or source through appropriate use of quotation marks, references, and the like. Plagiarizing is presenting someone else’s work as one’s own original work or thought. This constitutes plagiarism whether it is intentional or unintentional. The University of Washington takes plagiarism very seriously. Plagiarism may lead to disciplinary action by the University against the student who submitted the work. Any student who is uncertain whether his or her use of the work of others constitutes plagiarism should consult the course instructor for guidance before formally submitting the course work involved. (Sources: UW Graduate School Style Manual; UW Bothell Catalog; UW Student Conduct Code)

Academic Integrity

The University takes academic integrity very seriously. Behaving with integrity is part of our responsibility to our shared learning community. If you’re uncertain about if something is academic misconduct, ask me. I am willing to discuss questions you might have.

Acts of academic misconduct may include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating (working collaboratively on quizzes/exams and discussion submissions, sharing answers and previewing quizzes/exams)
  • Plagiarism (representing the work of others as your own without giving appropriate credit to the original author(s))
  • Unauthorized collaboration (working with each other on assignments)

Concerns about these or other behaviors prohibited by the Student Conduct Code will be referred for investigation and adjudication. Students found to have engaged in academic misconduct may receive a zero on the assignment (or other possible outcome).

Incomplete

An incomplete is given only when the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work until within two weeks of the end of the quarter and has furnished proof satisfactory to the instructor that the work cannot be completed because of illness or other circumstances beyond the student’s control. (Source: UW General Catalog Online, “Student Guide/Grading”)

Grade Appeal Procedure

A student who believes he or she has been improperly graded must first discuss the matter with the instructor. If the student is not satisfied with the instructor’s explanation, the student may submit a written appeal to the director of the Jackson School with a copy of the appeal also sent to the instructor. The director consults with the instructor to ensure that the evaluation of the student’s performance has not been arbitrary or capricious. Should the director believe the instructor’s conduct to be arbitrary or capricious and the instructor declines to revise the grade, the director, with the approval of the voting members of his or her faculty, shall appoint an appropriate member, or members, of the faculty of the Jackson School to evaluate the performance of the student and assign a grade. The Dean and Provost should be informed of this action. Once a student submits a written appeal, this document and all subsequent actions on this appeal are recorded in written form for deposit in a School file. (Source: UW General Catalog Online, “Student Guide/Grading”)

Concerns About a Course, an Instructor, or a Teaching Assistant

If you have any concerns about a Jackson School course or your instructor, please see the instructor about these concerns as soon as possible. If you are not comfortable talking with the instructor or not satisfied with the response that you receive, you may contact the chair of the program offering the course (names available from the Office of Student Services, Thomson Hall 111). If you have any concerns about a teaching assistant, please see the teaching assistant about these concerns as soon as possible. If you are not comfortable talking with the teaching assistant or not satisfied with the response that you receive, you may contact the instructor in charge of the course. If you are still not satisfied with the response that you receive, you may contact the chair of the program offering the course (names available from the Office of Student Services, Thomson Hall 111), or the Graduate School at G-1 Communications Building (543-5900). For your reference, these procedures are posted on a Jackson School bulletin board in the Student

Services Office, Room 111 Thomson Hall.

Equal Opportunity

The University of Washington reaffirms its policy of equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, disability, or status as a disabled veteran or Vietnam-era veteran in accordance with University of Washington policy and applicable federal and state statutes and regulations.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is defined as the use of one’s authority or power, either explicitly or implicitly, to coerce another into unwanted sexual relations or to punish another for his or her refusal, or as the creation by a member of the University community of an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment through verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. If you believe that you are being harassed, seek help—the earlier the better. You may speak with your instructor, your teaching assistant, the director of student services (111 Thomson), or the director of the Jackson School (406 Thomson). In addition, you should be aware that the University has designated

special people to help you. They are: University Ombudsman and Ombudsman for Sexual Harassment (for complaints involving faculty members and teaching assistants) Susan L. Neff, 301 Student Union, 543-6028; and the University Complaint Investigation and Resolution Office, 616-2028. (Sources: UW Graduate School, CIDR, Office of the President)

Office of Scholarly Integrity

The Office of Scholarly Integrity is housed in the Office of the Vice-Provost. The Office of Scholarly Integrity assumes responsibility for investigating and resolving allegations of scientific and scholarly misconduct by faculty, students, and staff of the University of Washington. The Office of Scholarly Integrity coordinates, in consultation and cooperation with the Schools and Colleges, inquiries and investigations into allegations of scientific and scholarly misconduct. The Office of Scholarly Integrity is responsible for compliance with reporting requirements established by various Federal and other funding agencies in matters of scientific or scholarly misconduct. The Office of Scholarly Integrity maintains all records resulting from inquiries and investigations of such allegations. University rules (Handbook, Vol. II, Section 25-51, Executive Order #61) define scientific and scholarly misconduct to include the following forms of inappropriate activities: intentional misrepresentation of credentials; falsification of data; plagiarism; abuse of confidentiality; deliberate violation of regulations applicable to research. Students can report cases of scientific or scholarly misconduct either to the Office of Scholarly Integrity, to their faculty adviser, or the department chair. The student should report such problems to whomever he or she feels most comfortable. (Sources: UW web page (http://www.grad.washington.edu/OSI/osi.htm); minutes of Grad School Executive Staff and Division Heads meeting, 7/23/98)

Religious Accommodations

Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at Religious Accommodations Policy (https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/). Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the Religious Accommodations Request form (https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/).

Safety

Call SafeCampus at 206-685-7233 anytime – no matter where you work or study – to anonymously discuss safety and well-being concerns for yourself or others. SafeCampus’s team of caring professionals will provide individualized support, while discussing short- and long-term solutions and connecting you with additional resources when requested.

 

 

Catalog Description: 
Study of literature in its relation to culture. Focuses on literature as a cultural institution, directly related to the construction of individual identity and the dissemination and critique of values.
Department Requirements Met: 
Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
September 24, 2021 - 1:54pm
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