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C LIT 323 A: Studies In The Literature Of Emerging Nations

Narratives of Exile and Displacement

Meeting Time: 
MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
Location: 
MGH 254
SLN: 
11846
Instructor:
Norma Kaminsky

Syllabus Description:

C LIT 323 A: LITERATURE OF EMERGING NATIONS: Narratives of Exile and Displacement

Winter 2016

 

Instructor: Norma Kaminsky - ninsky@uw.edu

Class meets Monday and Wednesday 3:30-5:20 at MGH 254

Office Hours: PDL B-202, Wednesday and Friday 2:30-3:30, and by appointment

https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/1020775

 

Course Description

The 2015 migrant crisis in Europe is the most recent and visible example of massive geographical displacement of human populations. Yet the phenomenon of voluntary and involuntary migration is not new. War, human rights abuses, economic hardship, and political upheaval force individuals and entire communities to migrate to places where their lives are not threatened. While the study of displacement has typically been taken up by political scientists, sociologists, and historians, fictional literature also contributes to sharing and understanding the experience of geographical dislocation. This course will examine cases of migration and exile from North Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America, as portrayed in novels, short stories, and memoires. We will discuss the historical background of each case in order to situate the literary work; we will also practice literary analysis and discover how works of literature are different from those produced by other disciplines, how extra-textual information helps to achieve a richer understanding of a literary text, and, conversely, how fictional works enrich our understanding of historical and social facts.

 

Objectives

C LIT 323 is intended to develop critical thinking while interpreting and writing about literary texts that deal with migration and displacement.

 

 Course materials (Books available at University Bookstore and Odegaard course reserves

  • Ben Jelloun, Tahar. Leaving Tangier. Trans. Linda Coverdale. New York: Penguin, 2009.
  • Brink, André. Imaginings of Sand. New York: Harcourt & Brace, 1996.
  • Dorfman, Ariel. Heading South, Looking North: A Bilingual Journey. New York: Penguin, 1999.
  • **Optional**: Parkes, Nii Ayikwei. South of South: An Anthology Devoted to the Humanity and Narrative of Migration. London: Peepal Tree Press, 2011.
  • McClennen, Sophia. "The Diasporic Subject in Ariel Dorfman's Heading South, Looking North." MELUS 30,1 (Spring, 2005): 169-88. (Canvas file)
  • Dixon, Shelley. "Stories or history?”: Female Counter Narratives in André Brink's Imaginings of Sand." Journal of the Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association 2004.101 (May 2004): 39-70. (Canvas file)
  • Alami, Ahmed Idrissi. " Dialectics of Desire, Victimhood and Postcolonial Migrancy in Tahar Ben Jelloun’s Leaving Tangier." South Central Review, 30.2 (Summer 2013): 1-31. (Canvas file)

 

Expectations and Requirements

  • Attendance and participation: For each class meeting, all students should be be prepared to share orally: 1) a quote (a sentence or two that encapsulates an important point of the reading, or something curious, intriguing, or useful for discussion or a paper); 2) a comment or question for discussion (related to the quote) to address things such as why something in the narrative matters, how it relates to your life, to current events, how is it relevant to the here and now, why we should care). Each meeting, a few students will share their quote and question to start the class discussion.
  • Occasional unscheduled reading quizzes.
  • One preliminary essay on short story.
  • 2 Short papers: A one-page paper for Heading South and for Imaginings of Sand. Each paper should serve to organize your thoughts and plan a possible final essay. Do not summarize the plot; instead, develop a question that can serve as the basis for a thesis, and answer this question. Use at least one quote from each reading, and write the Work(s) Cited in MLA format.
  • One final 1500-2000-word analytical essay (5-7 pages) on one or two works studied in class or from South of South.

 

 Grading

  • Participation                                  25%
  • Preliminary essay on short story  5%
  • Quizzes                                        10%
  • Short papers                                30%
  • Final essay                                  30%

 

Academic conduct

Plagiarism, or academic dishonesty, is presenting someone else's ideas or writing as your own. You are encouraged to refer to other people's thoughts and writing—as long as you cite them. As a matter of policy, any student found to have plagiarized any piece of writing in this class will be reported to the College of Arts and Sciences for review. More information may be found at http://depts.washington.edu/grading/pdf/AcademicResponsibility.pdf.

 

Resources and tutoring

- Odegaard Writing and Research Center provides writing and research assistance from trained writing tutors during all stages of the writing process. http://depts.washington.edu/owrc

- Clue (Center for Learning and Undergraduate Enrichment) offers help at any point of the writing process. http://depts.washington.edu/aspuw/develop/writing-center/

- Purdue Owl: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/679/01/

 

Accommodation for students with disabilities

If you need accommodation for a disability, please contact the Disability Services Office (DSO) (http://www.washington.edu/admin/dso/students/index.html) and let me know on the first day of class.

 

CALENDAR

Ses

 

Class content

Due today

 

WEEK 1

Introduction

 

1

M 4 JAN

Introduction; Short story from South of South

 

2

W 6 JAN

Short story from South of South

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 2

Political Exile and Latin American dictatorships

 

3

M 11 JAN

History; Dorfman 1-4

Preliminary essay on short story

4

W 13 JAN

Dorfman 5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 3

Latin America

 

5

M 18 JAN

HOLIDAY

 

6

W 20 JAN

Dorfman 7-12

Class in MGH 251

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 4

Latin America

 

7

M 25 JAN

Dorfman 15-15

 

8

W 27 JAN

Dorfman 16-Epilogue; McClennen

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 5

South Africa, Apartheid, Exile, and Back

 

9

M 1 FEB

History; Brink 1-2

Short paper 1: Heading South

10

W 3 FEB

Brink 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 6

South Africa

 

11

M 8 FEB

Brink 4-6

 

12

W 10 FEB

Brink 7; Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 7

North African Emigration

 

13

M 15 FEB

HOLIDAY

 

14

W 17 FEB

Ben Jalloun 1-10

Short paper 2: Imaginings

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 8

North Africa

 

15

M 22 FEB

Ben Jalloun 11-20

 

16

W 24 FEB

Ben Jalloun 21-30

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 9

Conclusions

 

17

M 29 FEB

Ben Jalloun 31-40

 

18

W 2 MAR

Alami

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEEK 10

Conferences

 

19

M 7 MAR

Conferences

Outline and draft final paper

20

W 9 MAR

Conferences

Outline and draft final paper

 

F 11 MAR

 

Final essay due by 5 PM

 

Additional Details:

The 2015 migrant crisis in Europe is the most recent and visible example of massive geographical displacement of human populations. Yet the phenomenon of voluntary and involuntary migration is not new. War, human rights abuses, economic hardship, and political upheaval force individuals and entire communities to migrate to places where their lives are not threatened. While the study of displacement has typically been taken up by political scientists, sociologists, and historians, fictional literature also contributes to sharing and understanding the experience of geographical dislocation. This course will examine cases of migration and exile from North Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America, as portrayed in novels, short stories, and memoires. We will discuss the historical background of each case in order to situate the literary work; we will also practice literary analysis and discover how works of literary are different from those produced by other disciplines, how extra-textual information helps to achieve a richer understanding of a literary text, and, conversely, how fictional works enrich our understanding of historical and social facts.

Catalog Description: 
Novels and short stories, from Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Discusses relationship of Western literary genres to an oral literary tradition, as well as issues like colonialism, gender relations, narrative technique, native and non-native languages.
Department Requirements Met: 
Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: 
Diversity (DIV)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
September 13, 2016 - 9:12pm
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