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C LIT 323 A: Studies In The Literature Of Emerging Nations

Race, Police, Empire

Meeting Time: 
TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
Location: 
SMI 115
SLN: 
11798
Instructor:
William Arighi
William Arighi

Syllabus Description:

C LIT 323: Literatures of Emerging Nations

Race, Police, Empire

The emergence of nationalist thought developed in the nineteenth century alongside new discourses of race and new apparatuses of social control. As social divisions came to be seen as biological and eternal characters of "peoples," the nation also took shape as the identity of newly ethnicized populations. All of these developments occurred within a world shaped by the European imperial expansion that covered almost the entire globe by the end of the nineteenth century, and which began to deteriorate after the catastrophic wars at the turn of the twentieth (in the Crimea, southern Africa, west and east Asia, and Europe). While many of the questions of political sovereignty that developed within empire became moot after the Second World War and the waves of decolonization that took place across the globe in the 1950s and 1960s, the legacies of empire's race-thinking and social policing remain embedded in the nation-state. How did these problems come to be linked? In what ways does culture--such as literature and film--shape our thinking about race and policing, and in what ways is it shaped by these developments? What role does policing have in the perpetuation and exacerbation of racial inequalities and race-thought within the nation-state?

This course will examine fiction and films produced by artists from Indonesia, the Philippines, Senegal, Nigeria, South Africa, and the United States of America. The readings and films for this course will focus on how national, racial, and gender identity is articulated with questions of culture, police, and empire from the end of the nineteenth century to the post-World War II world. Secondary readings will include work by Gloria Anzaldúa, Achille Mbembe, Frantz Fanon, and Michel Foucault.

This course satisfies VLPA and DIV requirements, and also may count as a Foundations Course for the Diversity Minor.

CL 323-Race Police Empire-REVISED.docx

Additional Details:

The emergence of nationalist thought developed in the nineteenth century alongside new discourses of race and new apparatuses of social control. As social divisions came to be seen as biological and eternal characters of “peoples,” the nation also took shape as the identity of newly ethnicized populations. All of these developments occurred within a world shaped by the European imperial expansion that covered almost the entire globe by the end of the nineteenth century, and which began to deteriorate after the catastrophic wars at the turn of the twentieth (in the Crimea, southern Africa, west and east Asia, and Europe). While many of the questions of political sovereignty that developed within empire became moot after the Second World War and the waves of decolonization that took place across the globe in the 1950s and 1960s, the legacies of empire’s race-thinking and social policing remain embedded in the nation-state. How did these problems come to be linked? In what ways does culture—such as literature and film—shape our thinking about race and policing, and in what ways is it shaped by these developments? What role does policing have in the perpetuation and exacerbation of racial inequalities and race-thought within the nation-state?

 

This course will investigate the development of literary and film culture produced in sub-Saharan Africa, north Africa, Southeast Asia, and the United States of America. The readings and films for this course will focus on how national, racial, and gender identity is articulated with questions of culture, police, and empire from the end of the nineteenth century to the post-World War II world.

Catalog Description: 
Novels and short stories, from Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Discusses relationship of Western literary genres to an oral literary tradition, as well as issues like colonialism, gender relations, narrative technique, native and non-native languages.
Department Requirements Met: 
Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: 
Diversity (DIV)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 28, 2016 - 9:20am
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